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100% Pure New York Maple Syrup - 1 Pint - 16 oz. NY Jug

Dark amber, robust flavor, no additives, 100% organic, gluten free

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NYCfigs Staten Island, NY US
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Description

In honor of National Maple Syrup Day (December 17th), I've decided to list some of my family's delicious homemade maple syrup.  This listing is for a 1 pint (16 oz) jug of dark amber 100% pure maple syrup.  Our maple syrup is all natural with nothing added.  It is 100% organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, with a robust and unique maple flavor.  Packaged in BPA-free containers.  You will receive a jug similar to the one in the picture.  Pictures of glass bottles are added to show color.  We also have pint and 1/2 pint maple leaf bottles, quart and 1/2 pint NY jugs and 8 oz. glass jugs.  Any of them would make a wonderful gift.

Click here to view our complete inventory of maple syrup.

In addition to growing fig trees in NYC, my family produces 20-25 gallons of maple syrup annually from our 100+ acre property located on the top of Franklin Mountain in beautiful Oneonta, NY.  More affectionately known as Sunny Springs.  Each year in late winter we hand-tap, collect, and process 800 - 1000 gallons of sap from naturally occurring maple trees located deep in our woods.  Our primary sap producers are several rows of massive sugar maples on a gentle east-facing slope.  These old trees line several ancient rock walls which criss-cross a small portion of the property.  This 'Sugar Bush' sits just below a 10-acre stand of red pine trees, and the ground just above the pine trees is peppered with artisanal springs.  It's no mistake these trees were left untouched for generations as pure spring water rises from deep within the earth, spills over through the pine floor, and feeds these deep woods maple trees.  The taste of syrup produced from the sap of these trees alone is outstanding.  But we collect and blend sap from a variety of old-growth maple species and you can really taste the difference in the syrup.  Our sap is hand filtered, then boiled in pans, outdoors on a wood-fired stove.  Once the sap has boiled enough to concentrate the natural sugars we draw and finish it in a controlled environment.  The almost finished syrup is slowly brought back to boiling and tested for density and sugar content.  When the proper consistency is achieved, the syrup is filtered through a hand operated press and into a canner where it is packaged in tamper-resistant bottles, between 180F - 200F.  

A typical evening of finishing and bottling will usually net around 5 gallons of maple syrup for us.  That's a far cry from the amount of syrup the large producers pump out in a day.  The large maple syrup producers probably spill more syrup in a day that would take my family all week to produce.  I think that's what sets the small-batch maple syrup producer apart from the larger producers.  The maple syrup industry is highly regulated and a lighter colored syrup has become the standard for higher profits.  Large producers mechanically collect or buy thousands of gallons of sap daily from places they are not familiar with.  More sap = more profit.  Their sap is fed into truck-sized reverse-osmosis machines then finished on automated filtering and canning machines.  So the difference in the color and taste of the syrup is immediately apparent.  Small producers will typically have a darker syrup while large producers will boast a lighter colored product.  And my opinion is they've lost the delicious hearty taste.  By standardizing the industry, the maple syrup from a large producer in Vermont tastes the same as a large producer in Wisconsin.  It's just blah.  Pure, natural maple syrup is supposed to have color and a rich maple flavor.  It's supposed to be unique to the region and producer.  Real maple syrup should have the taste of sunshine, rain, and woods rich with life.  From the woods-grown trees to the outdoor cooking and handling of the sap, to the hand finishing and bottling.  Side by side I'd take a small producers' maple syrup over any of the larger producer's any day of the week.  

My family will typically process 4 or 5 batches of syrup annually.  Everyone pitches in and we usually finish packaging and cleaning in the late evening.  But that's when we get to enjoy the fruits of our labor.  Our tradition is a dessert of vanilla ice cream on a fresh waffle, covered with hot maple syrup.  It's delicious!  The kids love it and really gives them something to look forward to.  So, in addition to the traditional pancakes, waffles, and french toast, here are some other culinary uses for delicious maple syrup:

  • Mix it into a hot bowl of oatmeal or grits
  • Drizzle over bacon
  • Add a teaspoon to a cup of yogurt
  • Add a bit to any cooked vegetables and toss
  • Use it to flavor frostings, butter, whipped or sour cream (Maple butter is awesome on toast!)
  • Mix a bit into your favorite beverage
  • Drizzle over pork, chicken, or turkey
  • Goes great with any sweet potato or squash dish
  • Swap for molasses in almost any baking recipe
  • Cook it down to make pure maple sugar candy

These are only some suggestions that we use.  You're limited only by your own imagination here.  There's tons of uses and a quick online search will have you in maple syrup heaven in seconds.  Please refrigerate your maple syrup once the container is opened.